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Category Archive for 'Coffee'

Caz Dolowicz don’t plant tater, and don’t plant cotton, and dem dat plants ‘em is soon forgotten.

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One of America’s greatest public historians, Philip Dray has been in some unusual places but none more unusual than this: seated in an orange dinghy just launched from the Bay Ridge shore and headed for… the wine dark sea? For Staten Island? “No, no, no” the oarsman, Brian Berger, assures me. “Fort Lafayette!” All I saw […]

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MANY STORIES TOLD OF GIRLS DRUGGED, AS WAS MRS. GRAFF Anti-Vice Societies, However, Have Been Unable to Sub- stantiate the Tales APPARENTLY WELL FOUNDED “Dope” Put In Soda Water at Fount- ains and Girls Stabbed With Needles at Movies Point was given today, to the remarkable story of the arrest of Armand Megaro, charged by […]

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I don’t think Faulkner is worth the antebellum South, and I would rather not have had Kafka at the proce of twentieth-century European carnage. But in trying to locate contemporary American writing I look at the thirties, that supposedly meager decade if misfired artistic energy and of duped intellectuals and bad proletarian novels, and I […]

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“My brother’s in the Coast Guard,” Lee told him. “That’s why we’re here. He’s stationed in Ellis Island. Port security it’s called.” “My brother’s in Korea now.” “My other brother’s in the Marines. They might send him to Korea. That’s what I’m worried about.” “It’s not the Koreans you have to worry about,” Nicky Black […]

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Thereupon, the maidservants were instructed to reset the table and an elaborate spread of meat and vegetable dishes, along with other dainties of every kind, which had been prepared in anticipation of Hsi-men Ch’ing’s return, was laid before them. Sister-in-law Wu, sensing that the time had come to take flight, asserted that she did not […]

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Ya’ll know the four great classic Chinese novels, right? Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Water Margin, Journey To The West and Dream of the Red Chamber. We’ll discuss translations and swap drunken monk stories another post but one translator of Water Margin— also known as Outlaws of the Marsh— is one Sidney Shapiro (b. 1915), […]

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Arnold Schoenberg was from from Vienna but later moved to Los Angeles, with stops in Berlin, Paris, Boston and New York in between. Caz Dolowicz was from Sands Street, but later moved to Bay Ridge, with a few years in Crown Heights, Flatbush and Marine Park in between. Arnold Schoenberg was born Jewish in 1874, […]

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Police Files, October 1958 On the morning of Tuesday, September 8th, the lonely strip of county road lying between Sauk City and Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin, was visited by death. Bloody, brutal and wanton death at the hand of a man with insane, murderous greed in his heart. Mimi Lipson, Food and Beverage (2009) Pinky’s […]

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In honor of the great contributions Brooklyn’s mostly proud blind people have made to our Armed Forces over the years, I’m delighted to reintroduce this interview between a monocle-wearing historian, Brian Berger, and the nearly sightless novelist Jim Knipfel. As for Woodrow Wilson, the Staunton, Virginia native who presided over  the first Armistice Day, he […]

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