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Category Archive for 'Ye Olden Dayes'

Beadel Debevoise reports: Jim Knipfel is a fat, bald Brooklyn writer rapidly approaching his 50s. Indeed, in the shifty light of the Shore Hotel room we’re sharing this rainy summer morning in Coney Island, some might say he is well past fifty. If a grumpy reputation precedes him– largely due to Jim’s candor in his […]

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Beadel Debevoise says… whuh? “There are several million extras in the black and white B-movie called Mondo Manhattan, lifestyles of the hungry and the homeless, dying within plate glass inches of the semi-rich eating in the trendy restaurants. A backdrop of dreams, old neighborhoods and the Old New York of Damon Runyon, Ben Hecht and […]

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Zincsmith Billiard mourns: Ya’ll remember the Overtime Pub, right? Until just a couple years ago it was open at 591 3rd Avenue, at the corner of 16th Street, cheek by jowl with the Prospect Expressway above & both Fort Hamilton Ave & the 3rd Ave entrance to the BQE below. (Until recently, looking east on […]

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This is Beadel, Beadel Debevoise from the Greenpoint Branch of the Brooklyn Public Library at Norman & Leonard, built in 1906. It’s no great secret that world of echt-Brooklyn letters begins with one Mr. Henry Miller, formerly of Driggs Street in Williamsburg, Decatur Street in Bushwick, Eastern District High School over on Keap Street, etc. […]

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The Publisher himself makes a rare appearance: John Strausbaugh is not America’s #1 Best Selling Black Author but his last book, Black Like You: Blackface, Whiteface, Insult & Imitation in American Popular Culture did well enough that it’s coming out in paperback. This is excellent news, for although some would prefer we not discuss race […]

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WWIB’s own Wicked Selector, DJ Admin, presents… BZA!! morning ya’ll, just a quick one before i flood the block with coffee but i was out in Flatbush yesterday & thought this was interesting… even a bit unusual*. what is it? well, of course there was no press– if slaves counted as 3/5th of a citizen […]

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In the broadest outline, Brooklyn: white settlement since 1624, with black slavery and the displacement of the Canarsee Indians following soon after. Brooklyn itself was but one of six towns…

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