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Category Archive for 'Brownsville'

My appointment was for the evening. Dreiser, who is finishing a book, “An American Tragedy,” in a specially rented New York office, lives in Brooklyn, which is also the base of my visits to Gotham. Accordingly, I show up at this place, ready for the regular chat about books and people. Drawing up alongside the […]

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Yes, many’s the night I attended a recital in one of these hallowed musical morgues and each time I walked out I thought not of the music I had heard but of one of my foundlings, one of the bleeding cosmococcic crew I had hired or fired that day and the memory of whom neither […]

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Lee Sing and Miss Liberty Produce Patriotic Chop Suey Lee Wong Sing took a walk Sunday and, thanks to his own restless spirit, thanks to the Fourth of July, and thanks to the burning patriotism of the reporters at Brooklyn Police Headquarters, it landed him on the front pages today. Lee Wong Sing is 11 […]

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When I was child, Brownsville existed in a large enclave, the outer borders of which I was only dimly aware. Surrounded by the Negro violence of the Bedford-Stuyvesant district, the Nazi “gemutchlichkeit” of Ridgewood, the Slavic solemnity of East New York, the middle-class gentility of East Flatbush and the garbage dumps of Canarsie, Brownsville was […]

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It’s Gettysburg Address Day! And earlier in the week Michael Kazin review Philip Dray’s There Is Power In A Union: The Epic Story of Labor in America for The Washington Post. Michael’s father Alfred was great admirer (mostly) of Edmund Wilson’s astoundng¬†Patriotic Gore, and so am I, although I wish Wilson had written about Frederick […]

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I don’t think Faulkner is worth the antebellum South, and I would rather not have had Kafka at the proce of twentieth-century European carnage. But in trying to locate contemporary American writing I look at the thirties, that supposedly meager decade if misfired artistic energy and of duped intellectuals and bad proletarian novels, and I […]

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On February 15, 1956, the social spotlight flashed into General Sessions Court where a habitue of Bank Account Alley appeared before Judge John A. Mullen and pleaded guilty to two counts covering a $170,000 swindle. Originally, playboy Robert H. Schlesinger had been charged with eight counts totaling $330,00 gained by his fraud.¬† Schlesinger is Park […]

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“What Richard Abneg had carried forward, always, anyhow, was a certain sense of his own crucial place in the island’s life. He’d never copped out. And the beard, that too was uncompromised, continuous. He grew it when he was fifteen and reading Howard Zinn and Charles Bukowski and Emmett Grogan. I soaked up Harriet’s description […]

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Emptying. Airmail: the garbage parts flutter and glide and plummet, thrown out in a sweet, athletic arc. They drop through morning sunlight into shade. The bag pulls its ripcord: disintegrates. Cans’ flat bottoms wink sun back, flash-flash, end over end: C and C Cola, Cerveza Rheingold, Raid (do not incinerate), Caf√© Bustelo and Spam. One […]

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HELLO! THERE, SEA SERPENT! A Brooklyn Man Says He Is Confident He Met One While Fishing Mr. M.A. Russell, of 188 Bridge street, says that he and two companions, while fishing on Sunday, about 7 A.M., off Long Beach, saw a sea serpent. There were on the boat at the time a dozen bottles of […]

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