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Category Archive for 'Dial J For Jewish'

Out at sea a single clarinet begins to play, a droll melody joined in on after a few bars by guitars and mandolins. Birds huddle bright-eyed on the beach. Katje’s heart lightens, a little, at the sound. Slothrop doesn’t yet have the European reflexes to clarinets, he still thinks of Benny Goodman and not of […]

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Well, let us move on to hear the music. It was being played by the Fugs, or rather— to be scrupulously phenomenological— Mailer heard the music first, then noticed the musicians and their costumes, then recognized two of them as Ed Sanders and Tuli Kupferberg and knew it was the Fugs. Great joy! The were […]

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When I was child, Brownsville existed in a large enclave, the outer borders of which I was only dimly aware. Surrounded by the Negro violence of the Bedford-Stuyvesant district, the Nazi “gemutchlichkeit” of Ridgewood, the Slavic solemnity of East New York, the middle-class gentility of East Flatbush and the garbage dumps of Canarsie, Brownsville was […]

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It’s Gettysburg Address Day! And earlier in the week Michael Kazin review Philip Dray’s There Is Power In A Union: The Epic Story of Labor in America for The Washington Post. Michael’s father Alfred was great admirer (mostly) of Edmund Wilson’s astoundng Patriotic Gore, and so am I, although I wish Wilson had written about Frederick […]

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“What’s thet you’re looking at now?” “A letter, a letter. And if you think I’m gonna read a guy’s letter, you’re crazy. It’s his letter, ain’t it? Why do you ask so many stupid questions?” “I didn’t axe you to read the letter, I want to know what it says on it,” moaned the other […]

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Ya’ll know the four great classic Chinese novels, right? Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Water Margin, Journey To The West and Dream of the Red Chamber. We’ll discuss translations and swap drunken monk stories another post but one translator of Water Margin— also known as Outlaws of the Marsh— is one Sidney Shapiro (b. 1915), […]

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Then late in the morning of Saturday, December 28, 1936, when the Knishe Queen announced the coming of the three new flavors (apple-cherry, sour lemon, nutty onion); after Jerky Jacob the Old Clothes Man sent out postcards to his best customers (“I am right now in a good position to make VERY terrific deals on […]

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And from their fifth-floor plus stoop, under the good first sun, they panned and picked out Gelfman drawing for himself the first soda of the day; Dopey Duhvee leaning over his triycle to drool down big, rich spit bombs that burst over his mother’s shoes; Mrs. Chepper slipping the leash off her old Pekinese, blaring […]

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Jason Cohen is what Grammy Hall would call a real Jew. Time was, that wouldn’t have been a big deal, at least not in Brooklyn; the place was full of ‘em! Cohen even lived in his mother’s ancestral homeland of Midwood for a couple years in the early-1990s— Midwood! And let me tell ya’ll, Midwood […]

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Uptown, Hazel Scott was big excitement for some of the biggest Hollywood stars. Franchot Tone was mad for her, Burgess Meredith, the biggest society playboys in New York. All looking for big excitement, and she was. Franklin D. Roosevelt Jr. had a crush on her. He liked her so much that he brought his mother, […]

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