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Category Archive for 'Navy Yard'

He [Sherwood Anderson] was very unsure of himself; that is why he was never in a hurry with anybody, for it takes a long time to understand– or to misunderstand– people. He never had the American “busy” malady. Nor had Dreiser; if you wanted to see him, he always asked you to come over right […]

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Sands Street runs through lower Brooklyn like a varicose vein. It leads from the main gate of the Navy Yard to the subway stations. It is a tough, knotted street of saloons, laundries, tattoo parlors, dry cleaners, groceries, Coffee Pots, and lodgings. Its stores sell clothes, trinkets, watches, photographs, and anything else to snatch a […]

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From the get-go, Birdland became one of his favorite haunts. He always went to the 52nd Street club alone. He’d pay two dollars to the cashier at the bottom of the stairs after hassling with a midget-spade about his proof of age, and stand at the bar or sit in the gallery and drink Cutty […]

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It was with a faint hope that, after all, our ardent desires might be realized, when we were informed that Rev. Henry Ward Beecher had gone to Washington to intercede for the acceptance of the regiment, and although we could not understand how he could expect President Lincoln or the Secretary of War to order […]

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Caz Dolowicz don’t plant tater, and don’t plant cotton, and dem dat plants ‘em is soon forgotten.

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MANY STORIES TOLD OF GIRLS DRUGGED, AS WAS MRS. GRAFF Anti-Vice Societies, However, Have Been Unable to Sub- stantiate the Tales APPARENTLY WELL FOUNDED “Dope” Put In Soda Water at Fount- ains and Girls Stabbed With Needles at Movies Point was given today, to the remarkable story of the arrest of Armand Megaro, charged by […]

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I don’t think Faulkner is worth the antebellum South, and I would rather not have had Kafka at the proce of twentieth-century European carnage. But in trying to locate contemporary American writing I look at the thirties, that supposedly meager decade if misfired artistic energy and of duped intellectuals and bad proletarian novels, and I […]

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As a man in the 12th Alabama wrote, “we were into it hot and heavy. I thought I had been in hot places before— I thought I had heard Minnie ball; but that day capped the climax.” Once in position the Alabamians stubbornly kept up a steady fire of their own, but they could not advance […]

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Douglass’ advocacy of slave revolt was a view shared much more widely among black than among white abolitionists. In 1856, Lewis Tappan became alarmed at Douglass’ “vengeance is mine” attitude toward slaveholders. “In your speeches and in your paper,” Tappan complained, “you advocate the slaughter of slaveholders. I cannot go with you.” He accused the […]

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The arrangements on the second— and top— floor at 37-57 82d Street were little, if any, short of ideal. The offices of Dr. Harold Schwartz, a chiropodist, occupied the front of the modest structure a block off Roosevelt Avenue in the heart of Jackson Heights, a prosperous middle-class residential district in New York City’s borough […]

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