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Category Archive for 'All-City'

Second in a series of tributes to my friend, Marshall. In the last week, I’ve been pleasantly amused by Patell and Waterman’s History of New York account of Marshall’s intermittent computer woes (I knew them well); appreciated the range of appreciations Dissent has offered, illustrated by the priceless photo of Marshall with his doppelganger, a sculpture of himself […]

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My friend and collaborator, Marshall Berman, died of a heart attack on Wednesday September 11 while at the Metrto Diner, near his long time home on the Upper West Side; he was 72. Corey Robin, Todd Gitlin for The Tablet and the editors of Dissent have all offered their thoughts but in lieu— for now— of my own memories […]

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According to the astrologer Evangeline Adams, America is born at 3:03 on the 4th of July, Gemini Rising. It is to be mercurial, restless, violent. It looks to the Philippines and calls gluttony the New Frontier. It looks to South America and intervenes in the internal affairs of its nations; piracy is termed “bringing about […]

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From the get-go, Birdland became one of his favorite haunts. He always went to the 52nd Street club alone. He’d pay two dollars to the cashier at the bottom of the stairs after hassling with a midget-spade about his proof of age, and stand at the bar or sit in the gallery and drink Cutty […]

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As if we had not strained the voting and digestive calibre of American Democracy to the utmost for the last fifty years with the millions of ignorant foreigners, we have now infused a powerful percentage of blacks, with about as much intellect and calibre (in the mass) as so many baboons. But we stood the […]

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Caz Dolowicz don’t plant tater, and don’t plant cotton, and dem dat plants ‘em is soon forgotten.

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HOW THE RIOT STARTED Somebody Threw A Cucumber and It Struck an Italian Then there was a Rain of Paving Stones on Myrtle Avenue, and the Row Did Not Cease Until a Wagon Load of Police Interfered Two parties of laborers were at work on Myrtle Avenue near Ryerson street yesterday afternoon. One of the […]

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One of America’s greatest public historians, Philip Dray has been in some unusual places but none more unusual than this: seated in an orange dinghy just launched from the Bay Ridge shore and headed for… the wine dark sea? For Staten Island? “No, no, no” the oarsman, Brian Berger, assures me. “Fort Lafayette!” All I saw […]

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MANY STORIES TOLD OF GIRLS DRUGGED, AS WAS MRS. GRAFF Anti-Vice Societies, However, Have Been Unable to Sub- stantiate the Tales APPARENTLY WELL FOUNDED “Dope” Put In Soda Water at Fount- ains and Girls Stabbed With Needles at Movies Point was given today, to the remarkable story of the arrest of Armand Megaro, charged by […]

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Virtually every diarist and letter writer in the army commented on the friendliness of the inhabitants they met north of the Potomac, in contrast to what they had encountered over the past months in Virginia. The First Corps crossed the Pennsylvania line on June 30, and Lyman Holford of the 6th Wisconsin noted in his […]

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