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Category Archive for 'Weeksville'

IN MEMORY OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS A meeting to honor the memory of Frederick Douglass was held last night in the Concord Baptist Church of Christ on Duffield street. Among the speakers was the Rev. Hiram Hutchins, whose 85 years, it is said, make him the oldest living abolitionist. Others who addressed the meeting included the […]

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Three things about Empire Boulevard (there are more)*: First, what’s beef? In 1989, graffiti writer JA wilding on SONI’s house as recounted in Jim Dwyer’s excellent book Subway Lives (1991): JA JA JA JA JA JA JA JA JA JA JA JA JA JA JA. And so on. This really happened and it didn’t end […]

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How’re you gonna figure it? Me, Sammy Hines, once the sharpest, smartest cabbie in New York put out of commission by two young Broadway punks. Taken for a ride in my own hack. I just can’t get over it! A guy like me who’s lived all his life by trying to outsmart the world. For […]

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You folks that think it is easy to find something fresh to quarrel with every week ought to run this column for a couple of years. I druther  wash dishes. What am I to find fault with this Sunday, for instance? Vittles? Mine don’t quarrel with me so why should I quarrel with them? Politics? […]

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Cocktails and signs of “ads” flashing, light’s waterfalls, — Louis Zukofsky, from “55 Poems” (1941) Now and then there are flashes in the world of business, finance, sport, art or theatricals a colorful figure which comes we know not whence or how. But because it exerts enormous influence and kicks up dust generally, and because […]

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“Lays Of Chinatown and other Verses,” by George Macdonald Major, deals with the slums of New York and vicinity. This the author does not in a philanthropic manner, but as an itinerant photographer, who carried with him a phonograph. Some of the meter of some of the poems is very like what might be expected […]

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Once Upon A Time On Dean Street: L.J. Davis and Jonathan Lethem will be appearing at 7 pm next Tuesday, March 31, at the Community Bookstore, 143 7th Avenue in celebration of L.J.’s beautifully republished 1971 novel, A Meaningful Life. All living “brownstoners”— old and new, owners and renters, black, white and “Spanish,” as we […]

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“The Brooklyn Speech of Booker T. Washington, delivered Feb. 22, before the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, has been published in pamphlet form, and there is a tremendous demand for it from all parts of the country. It is the best and most complete statement of the Negro’s case that has yet been given.”— […]

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Caz Dolowicz explains: Greetings from a secret location in Pinellas County, Florida, where I keep my winter quarters and where from, today, I’d like to introduce the new staff of Who Walk In Brooklyn. Over the weeks, months and years to (is a preposition) come (is a verb), I hope all of them will become […]

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A Crispus Attucks Week Encore Presentation. Reproduced at left is  the list, taken by Captain Francis Titus, of the slaves of Bushwick in 1755; slavery would continue in Brooklyn until July 4, 1827. It’s  interesting to note that in most accounts of slavery in New York, the names of the  chattel are rarely given. Such […]

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