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Category Archive for 'Brooklyn Heights'

In the States, senators, mayors, governors, and local dignitaries all graved the various head tables. The New York gathering invited President James Buchanan to attend but he turned them down because of the press of public duties. He managed to send a message: “Poor Burns. I have always deplored his sad fate. He has ever […]

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There was morning gray in the sky as the sedan crossed Brooklyn Bridge. There was some pale blue in the sky as Vanning parked the car off Canal Street. He used the subway to get back to the Village, and upon entering his room the first direct move he made was to start packing his things. […]

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Well, let us move on to hear the music. It was being played by the Fugs, or rather— to be scrupulously phenomenological— Mailer heard the music first, then noticed the musicians and their costumes, then recognized two of them as Ed Sanders and Tuli Kupferberg and knew it was the Fugs. Great joy! The were […]

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Poetry And Miss Esmonds Tho’ poetry is one of the cheapest and profitable speculations of the literary world, we find not a few aspiring to be poets rather than be orators. This is a fact which goes to strongly prove that poetry has more charms than is generally supposed. It is the language of nature, […]

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I don’t think Faulkner is worth the antebellum South, and I would rather not have had Kafka at the proce of twentieth-century European carnage. But in trying to locate contemporary American writing I look at the thirties, that supposedly meager decade if misfired artistic energy and of duped intellectuals and bad proletarian novels, and I […]

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It was dark when Peter got off the subway in Brooklyn. The streets were thronged with people bound for movies, restaurants, bars or just strolling pleasurably in the night and eating hot dogs at the Fulton Street stands. With a feeling of orphan loss and mystery, and a kind of odd, enigmatical consolation, Peter hurried […]

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Sante? He was just a five letter word in the headlines to me. I vaguely knew he’d done some things— maybe even great things— but not until an hour ago did I know realize was a poet too. But, lo and behold, here I am, house sitting in Gowanus and there it is, snug between […]

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“What Richard Abneg had carried forward, always, anyhow, was a certain sense of his own crucial place in the island’s life. He’d never copped out. And the beard, that too was uncompromised, continuous. He grew it when he was fifteen and reading Howard Zinn and Charles Bukowski and Emmett Grogan. I soaked up Harriet’s description […]

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In honor of the great contributions Brooklyn’s mostly proud blind people have made to our Armed Forces over the years, I’m delighted to reintroduce this interview between a monocle-wearing historian, Brian Berger, and the nearly sightless novelist Jim Knipfel. As for Woodrow Wilson, the Staunton, Virginia native who presided over  the first Armistice Day, he […]

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330 Blind in Boro Making ‘Weapons’ For Armed Forces Cashmore Urges Brooklyn Support Drive For Unfortunate Some 330 blind men and women of Brooklyn, “making  weapons of a sort for our men in the services,” are engaged almost exclusively in war production, Borough President Cashmore said in an appeal for the 1942 Brooklyn Week for […]

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