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Category Archive for 'Southern Thing'

About 1 p.m. , at a given signal, a heavy cannonade was opened, and continued for about two hours with marked effect upon the enemy. His batteries replied vigorously at first, but toward the close their fire slackened perceptibly, and General Longstreet ordered forward the column of attack, consisting of Pickett’s and Heth’s divisions, in […]

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THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG A detailed account of the battle of Gettysburg has been received. On Wednesday, General Reynolds, commanding the first corps of our army, attacked the rebel Division of Gen. Ewell, west of the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The rebels took up a postion on rising ground west of town. Reynolds, somewhat hastily, […]

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Akhilleus, prince and greatest of the Akhains, be forebearing. They are badly hurt. All who were the best fighters are now lying among the ships with spear or arrow wounds. Diomêdès, Tydeus’ rugged son, was shot; Odysseus and Agamémnon, the great spearman, have spear wounds; Eurýpylos took an arrow shot deep in his thigh. Surgeons […]

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Achilles, great as you are, Don’t be vengeful. They are dying out there, All of our best— or who used to be our best— They’ve all been hit and are lying Wounded in camp. Diomedes is out, And Odysseus, a good man with a spear, Even Agamemnon has taken a hit. Eurypylus, too, an arrow in […]

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Douglass’ advocacy of slave revolt was a view shared much more widely among black than among white abolitionists. In 1856, Lewis Tappan became alarmed at Douglass’ “vengeance is mine” attitude toward slaveholders. “In your speeches and in your paper,” Tappan complained, “you advocate the slaughter of slaveholders. I cannot go with you.” He accused the […]

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IN MEMORY OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS A meeting to honor the memory of Frederick Douglass was held last night in the Concord Baptist Church of Christ on Duffield street. Among the speakers was the Rev. Hiram Hutchins, whose 85 years, it is said, make him the oldest living abolitionist. Others who addressed the meeting included the […]

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I first saw Mr. Lincoln in the early summer of 1863. I had a special object in seeing him at that time. I had been engaged in raising two regiments of colored men in Massachussetts, the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth. Two of my sons were in those regiments. Jefferson Davis had taken notice of these colored […]

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“What’s thet you’re looking at now?” “A letter, a letter. And if you think I’m gonna read a guy’s letter, you’re crazy. It’s his letter, ain’t it? Why do you ask so many stupid questions?” “I didn’t axe you to read the letter, I want to know what it says on it,” moaned the other […]

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The arrangements on the second— and top— floor at 37-57 82d Street were little, if any, short of ideal. The offices of Dr. Harold Schwartz, a chiropodist, occupied the front of the modest structure a block off Roosevelt Avenue in the heart of Jackson Heights, a prosperous middle-class residential district in New York City’s borough […]

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Have you ever been to Hawaii? I mean Hawaii— or Hawai’i— “the big island,” as they say, because Hilo is there, although Magnum lived on Oahu, and the University of Hawaii  Press is there too, in Honolulu. I’m not sure where Hawaiian punk/noise band the Fuckin’ Flyin’ A Heads came from; neither of the two […]

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